Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Fifty-Five




だいなごんきんとう

たきのおとは
たえてひさしく
なりぬれど

なこそながれて
なおきこえけれ




55

Fujiwara no Kinto

Though the waterfall
In its flow ceased long ago,
And its sound is stilled --

Yet, in name it ever flows,
And in fame may yet be heard.





55

He speaks
as if her ever
going away

would be his breath
going away.




Notes

"Fujiwara no Kintō (藤原 公任?, 966 – February 4, 1041), also known as Shijō-dainagon, was a Japanese poet, admired by his contemporaries [1] and a court bureaucrat of the Heian period. His father was the regent Fujiwara no Yoritada and his son Fujiwara no Sadayori.[2] An exemplary calligrapher and poet, he is given mention in works by Murasaki Shikibu, Sei Shōnagon and a number of other major chronicles and texts." -- Wikipedia

A noted Japanese waterfall's site draws attention even after the watercourse has been altered, drying up the falls. One can think of parallels in human fame.

It appears the Old Nurse visualizes the waterfall as it once was, with a picnic underway. Perhaps this emphasizes the sense of loss after the waterfall is gone.

http://www.visipix.com/sites-en/hoku_100_poem/pic.php?pic=55_1024.jpg
Risa visualizes a lover becoming aware of the vulnerability inherent in love.